Improvement, development and evaluation


Maudsley International can help governments and providers of services:

• formulate the best and most cost effective way to implement plans to improve people’s mental health and promote mental wellbeing;
• develop and improve services and systems;
• devise the best organisational structures and governance processes to make change happen and support services;
• evaluate any initiatives or improvements to make sure they have the required impact.

Our approach

Our starting point is what you want to achieve and the needs of your neighbourhood, region, country or workforce. In the first instance, we will help you review and reflect before making plans and taking action. We then create a team of experts who have the requisite skills to help you plan and effect change. We work collaboratively with our clients, and involve you in every step.

Our recommendations are informed by best practice from around the world, by the amount of financial resources that are available, and by the needs and perspectives of your citizens, service users, patients or employees. We also make sure the views of practitioners, managers and policymakers are considered.

We use various tools and techniques to help us ask the right questions and gather all the relevant information, some of which we have developed ourselves. Our own tools are based on Better Mental Health Care (2008), a step-by-step guide to developing modern mental health services by Graham Thornicroft and Michele Tansella (Graham Thornicroft chairs the Maudsley International Board).

Our services are provided by our expert staff, members of our Board and Maudsley International associates – health professionals, managers and researchers who work for South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM), the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London, and other expert organisations. Maudsley International operates independently but works in partnership with both SLaM and the IoPPN.

KCL5      SLa M5

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